Blog #7 Keep it Simple

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I’m going to be honest and tell you this photo is 50 yrs old! That’s me top right with 10 of my classmates. Can’t remember why it was such a select group, there were at least 30 in the class. However I can clearly remember all of the other children were the same size, slim with bony knees! There was one little girl who I remember had what was called ‘puppy fat’.

This reminds us of the dramatic difference in diet and lifestyle and size of children in 50 short years.

We are living in turbulent times, the NHS can’t keep up with the effects of obesity. Teachers can’t cope with behaviour problems in the classroom.
I know this sounds like ridiculous wishful thinking – but it isn’t really – could we reduce our children’s intake of sugar/artificial sweetener and processed food?

I’m not looking back with rose tinted specs but I can tell you that we all sat and behaved in class – at break time the boys always kicked a football and the girls would talk, skip or something. So there was quite a lot of physical activity, we walked to school as well. Also we all ate the same sort of food, sandwiches your mother had given you with a biscuit or bit of fruit.

Our physical and mental state must be related to the food we eat, and how much exercise we get. (Exercise releases feel good endorphins) childhood is the best time to start good habits.

There has been a lot of publicity this week about a psychiatrist condemning ‘clean eating’. He maintains there is a flood of people who are weak from lack of sugar, they are also bulimic from bingeing on junk food and vomiting.
I prefer to reframe this and say that eating unprocessed food with as few chemicals as is possible is how we are designed to eat.

Anorexia Nervosa is a highly distressing and life threatening disease. Patients need careful, specialist help. This is not a new condition though that can be conveniently blamed on anybody. I’ve lived through all sorts of fad diets that were definitely not healthy, but I don’t remember so much vitriol being heaped on the magazine authors that churned these diets out on a weekly basis.

I find it interesting that compulsive eating and obesity is not treated by psychiatrists in the same way. These patients are offered bariatric surgery. I’m sure surgery is effective but it seems like treating the symptoms and not the disease.

Being healthy doesn’t mean being hungry, don’t diet just be thoughtful about what you eat and also what you feed your children. Be independent, take your own nutritious snacks with you when you’re out for the day, a few unsalted nuts, or a home made sugar free treat.

Remember how important Vitamin D is for our health – here’s hoping we get plenty of sun this summer!

I’m going to finish with a lovely summer recipe from a friend, Inese Zute. Do check her blog and recipes.

Beetroot and Tahini dippen dappen

300g steamed/cooked beetroot 4 tbsp tahini
2 garlic cloves
2 tbsp apple cider vinegar2 tbsp olive oil
Blend together. Serve as a sauce on a salad, a spread or a dip.

The Language of Diet and Healthy Eating

I listen with interest when people talk about their diet. Overwhelmingly the words used are harsh. Such a shame when eating healthy, nutritious food is a pleasure.

Say as you do, and do as you say.

carrot cake

I listen with interest when people talk about their diet. Overwhelmingly the words used are harsh. Such a shame when eating healthy, nutritious food is a pleasure. How often do you say ‘I’ve been bad’, ‘I’ve sinned’ , ‘I’m weak, don’t have any willpower’? These thoughts are very negative and self critical, and certainly not helpful if you would like to make some positive changes in your diet.

How many times have we said ‘ I can’t change, it’s too hard’? That’s a statement I dispute. Let’s start by saying Change for Good is Easy. Say it as often as you like as loud as you like.
How many things are we actually in control of in our lives? Not many, not the economy, world peace, or our noisy neighbours. However we can decide what, when, how often and how much we eat. It is easy, we get to choose.

We all know that it is unwise to eat 3 jam doughnuts a day every day. However it is not a hanging offence to eat one on a Sunday if you feel like it – it’s not a sin, murder is a sin.

So back to language.’I’ve decided to stop eating refined sugar because I want to feel fit and healthy’. We can also add that our goal is to be sugar free, but if we achieve this 80% of the time that’s a huge success!
Another phrase I’d like you to consider when speaking to yourself and also children – I’ve been good so I deserve some chocolate. Let’s rethink that….
As time goes by and your new eating habits become established it just gets easier. You feel well, full of energy, you are eating less, but you are enjoying food.

Take a look in the mirror. The truth is we can all do our best with the material available. Your skin is improving in texture and colour, it’s calm and clear. Your hair will feel better. Your shape and posture is improving all because you have more energy and vim. Moving around is easier because your joints are benefitting too.

When you look at yourself give yourself some praise! You’re doing well! We may not all be going for a new career as a film star and be able to cope with the scrutiny of HD, but we can improve and look pretty good, whatever our age.

Which brings me to my next suggestion… I have always noticed that age and hormones are blamed for everything. I am just too stubborn to accept blanket statements like ‘Oh you’re 40 now, you’ll get middle age spread – everybody does’. No everybody doesn’t, I am in charge of myself and refuse to believe subliminal suggestions, however qualified the person is who puts them there.

So that’s enough from me today. Stay positive, remove processed food and refined sugar from your life and enjoy being healthy.

Today’s recipe is from Bear Grylls book – Fuel for Life. It’s one of my favourites. I cut it up into small pieces and freeze them, then I’ve always got a treat handy!

lemons